BLOG

Somebody tun le se Somebody da le ru

Written by NiMechE Press

  • December 26, 2019
  • 23

In the words of the great musician Daddy Showkey, “somebody tun le se, somebody da le ru


It is not news that the mental-physical exercise of dance and music floods in from an emotional court of creativity heaven. Dance music is one of the most favorite types of music, and it cuts across different genres.


In our culture, dance music is the most appreciated form of music which is little wonder as we mainly use percussion instruments to create music. Yoruba people have the Talking drums, Hausas have the Kora and for Igbo people, it is the Gong. I love eastern music; they are the real originators of highlife. Don’t let me get you started on that flute. My God!


Why am I telling you all this? I do not have the slightest idea. Maybe I’m simply trying to build an intelligent background for my Anti-Marlian premise. Yes, Anti-Marlian because na him de da le ru.


In my experience, there are two types of Marlians; the Naira Marlians and the Dollar Marlians. The Naira Marlians are the actual marlians. They are the ones dancing legwork, poco, obama, and the rest of the dances on the streets. They sing ‘Pxta’ with meaning; they believe that baby girl is a puta and they will say it to her face. They are the revolution. You could even go so far as to call them extremists.


The Dollar Marlians on the other hand are here to have fun, they enjoy the songs and what it makes their feet do. They also enjoy the thrills that the Naira Marlians get from the Marlian kind of music so they basically join in and feed off the excitement. I’m not saying a dollar marlian isn’t a true marlian, as a matter of fact, a dollar marlian is the worst kind; they do the paper work, the validation. They are practically the ambassadors and twitter lawyers and boy, are they the best representation that Marlians can have.


You see, the Dollar Marlians are my problem. They feed off the excitement and pawn off as Originals when they were in fact Sired. They give Naira Marlians the required legalization and their most common trait is knowing all the slangs. They are the ones that shout “Mafo!” from their Honda Civics and “Baby girl you’re a puta!” on their way back from ward, still in their lab coats. I tire for their group. Office workers, the rich kids, the educated, the smart and intelligent in the society that identify as Marlians, shitting in the face of socially conscious music and laughing off music that transmits the best parts of our culture. This is not you!


The truth is we enjoy our culture and the benefits in it. Contrary to how we might feel or think in the moment, our culture protects us. In security, culture is the first form of defense and in love, culture is Cupid’s potion. Culture protects us from the danger that is ourselves and also from dangers in the community; who doesn’t admire a cultured man or woman?


I cannot write an article like this without giving some credit to Falz the Bahd Guy who, antithetical to his name, is actually a good guy and Asa who just released the album ‘Lucid’ after a 5-year hiatus. Why does “Hiatus” sound so much like the name of a boy from the South-south of Nigeria? More importantly, why does every region in Nigeria except the north have a prefix? Think about it; South-west, South-east, even South-south. I mean, how south can the South be?


We all enjoy Love songs. It’s love, it’s natural, and we were born from it, one-night stand or not. We enjoy socially conscious music, that much we saw from the responses that viewers gave “This is Nigeria”. Let’s slow down for a minute and gauge our support for Marlian music and maybe do a give and take analysis.
For example: Give; I will dance poco. Take; I will not sing Pxta.

Give; I will sing ‘Inside life’. Take; I will not dance ‘soapy’.


In the end our society is hurt so you could either do more to heal it or less to hurt it, either way you are doing something.

I am not a Marlian


PS: This article is over 700 words. Please say something in the comment box and share the link with friends. You will not work in vain in Jesus name. Happy Boxing Day!!





23 responses to “Somebody tun le se Somebody da le ru”

  1. Aramide says:

    Amazing!!!!;

  2. Jcally says:

    There is a sense, albeit shallow, of reverence and respect associated with being called a Marlian. Also, it has proved easier to neglect responsibility and be a nuisance in society, than take charge of one’s life and be an agent of change (especially for youths).
    Now, when the reward for a youth taking the easier path (of irresponsibility) is an identity as a “Naira Marlian”, you’d understand why this Marlian thing is where it is now.

  3. Maryam says:

    It’s hilarious and I was attacked I identify as an intellectual marlian, that’ll make me fall in your category of Dollar marlian Except I don’t have dollar yet

    And I feel a need to defend myself – and other dollar marlians – regarding your obvious distaste to what we choose to identify as. I mean, the naira lyrics are quite vulgar and stuff, but loyalty to the cause – which is the breaking of stereotypes, challenging societal ills etc – is what is important and we must not lose sight of that.

    I mean, we work/coexist with naira marlians peacefully, working synergistically while gbese-ing and tesumole-ing. And you CANNOT – I have to stress this – denigrate or invalidate who we are by saying ‘That is not you’! I mean, what do you mean by that. Cancelling our whole identity because you don’t think us worthy of note? See ehn, that is sort of what the colonial massas did, and I, an intellectual marlian, would not be colonised!

    • Victor says:

      I don’t see it as cancelling your identity. I see it as pointing out the fact that there is no identity. Dollar Marlians or ‘intellectual’ marlians as you call it are actually not sure where they belong. Y’all are simply dancing on the proverbial fence, taking the occasional glimpse at the other side and deciding that it’s still too vulgar for people of your standing. So, fence it is still.
      Like I said, no identity.

    • Jcally says:

      Marlians! Marlians!! Marlians!!!

      What did you think of reading that just now? A group of people that’s challenging societal ills? I didn’t think so.
      I’ll focus on the intellectual in the oxymoron – Intellectual Marlian and ask: how can you acknowledge the louder message of profanity and vulgarity this so-called identity represents, and then sweep it under the rug because it also represents an almost imperceptible ideology that challenges stereotypes and, quite laughably, societal ills?
      Oh well, keep gbese-ing and tesumole-ing on your proverbial fence. This phase shall soon pass.

    • Tj. says:

      Hi Maryam (and everyone else),

      I’m choosing to comment via reply to yours, cause your comment was truly striking and you answered beautifully.

      Are you genuinely putting yourself in a box called identity and labelling it Marian? I don’t know you, yet I’m certain that like every human that exists, there is more to you than meets the eye. To tie all of you together and decide that the identity most preferred is “Marlian” is failing to “rate” yourself.

      I like how every one who is a fan of NM always starts by saying “his lyrics are vulgar…but”

      But what? Why are you making an exclusion for this human? You say he’s challenging societal stereotypes and such, well congratulations! A thousand other amazing people do that. And they do that without putting others down.

      NM has consistently showed disrespect for women, constituted authority, non-fans and such. That he creates “danceable music with nice beats” is no reason to excuse him. You can be both an amazing musician and a respectful human being.

      Plus, are his songs actually danceable? Don’t they already fit into the mold of the dance(s) that he and his squad have already created and keep creating?

      I’m conclusion, I think people can be whatever they want, but they must take ownership. If you want to be a Marlian in spite of the bad PR that comes with it, then do so boldly. No need to attempt to justify it, cause its not justifiable.

  4. Korede says:

    If you know you know. Quater pass…

  5. Eri says:

    Your write ups are art works. Beauty

  6. Omon says:

    I feel like music causes a lot of controversy and we basically support what we love which isn’t a bad idea. My problem is when people are being people are not fans for the love many just follow “majority” and lose their priorities.

  7. Mise says:

    Werey, Baby Girl you are a Puta

  8. Hellyn says:

    …Most ppl don’t know where they stand on this marlian issue… But its good to speak up and some other ppl might come to their senses…

  9. Paul says:

    Worthy read!

  10. Sayge says:

    The funniest blog post I’ve read this year. Well done bruv

  11. Hiatus says:

    i don’t speak Marlian but I understand.
    it is. a good read. i was intrigued.
    Asa’s album is great too.

  12. Ibk says:

    Culture is diverse. Culture is fluid. We define our culture. Right and Wrong is dependent on paradigms. It all depends on your view to life. Trying to enforce your view on others is not very laudable. We still have choices… Which ultimately defines Culture. Da le ru might be tun le se for others.. In the end It’s not that deep.
    Nice Read. I was entertained. Asa’s Album was also entertaining.

  13. Abdulrahman Adetunji says:

    This is a really brilliant piece and I enjoy the way you just explored the Marlian term. It is spot on.

  14. Korede says:

    Wetin Hiatus no go see for Calabar

  15. Oluwatomiwa says:

    It’s a nice write Korede.
    But for what the face of the movement stands for, I just see those (naira marlians) taking an easier route towards irresponsibility.

  16. Mary says:

    Zoom zoom! I cannot agree more abeg!

  17. M says:

    Great article!
    But, are we all just going to ignore the important fact that the north alone has no prefix?!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



More Posts

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: NIMECHE-UI LEGIT LEGACIES

As the session runs with so much of vibes and interests, the NIMechE-UI press considered interacting with the uneasy head...

EDITORIAL

The second semester of the 2020/2021 session resumed on the 26th of July, 2021 with only a few of us...

NIMechE-UI Elections: “Presidents-to-be” at the Press Night

Could it just be us? The two presidential aspirants of the NiMechE University of Ibadan had bold fisticuffs of words...


© 2019 NimecheUI. All rights reserved | Enoch